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MAPS OF CHINESE TURKESTAN AND KANSU

 
 

Sir Aurel Stein

 
   

Sir Aurel Stein's voluminous reports on his three expeditions to Chinese Turkestan and Kansu include numerous maps. Serindia and Innermostasia each have a separate volume - actually a box containing large map sheets. Desert Cathay and Ancient Khotan have pull-out maps in the back of the book. In a seprate report Stein described his surveying and the cartography of the maps for Innermostasia. Here is a listing of the folders in which we have listed the maps and photographs made of them.

 
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MEMOIR ON MAPS OF CHINESE TURKISTAN AND KANSU

. In this book Stein focuses, as the title indicates, on the creation of the maps and their content. Thus in Chapter I he writes and excellent description of the expeditions themselves from the point of view of the surveying and triangulation work. As these individual map sheets are described in this book , Stein notes what information is contained from each of the three expeditions. This volume is a very valuable discussion of the whole topographic survey and creation of the maps.

 
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Serindia - maps

This set of maps was published as one volume of Serindia - the report on the Second Expedition, the maps were compiled from the surveys conducted during the first and second of the expeditions and carefully corrected at the Survey of India to correct discrepencies. There are some areas surveyed during the third expedition that are not included.

 
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Serindia map index

In this list we provide links to each of the photographs we made of sections of the maps in Serindia. The maps are not numbered in the sequence in which they might be used to follow his narration in Serindia or Innermostasia. Rather, they are numbered from west to east in columns and from north to south in each column. Additional maps were published in other volumes describing Stein's 'personal narrative'.

 
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Maps of Chinese Turkestan and Kansu

This set of 57 maps was published as volume IV of Innermostasia - the report of the Third Expedition - the volume is actually a large box containing the set of individual map sheets.The maps were compiled from the surveys conducted during the first, second and third expeditions and carefully corrected at the Survey of India to correct discrepencies. The listing is by map number.

 
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Innermostasia map index

In this list we provide links to each of the photographs we made of sections of the maps inInnermostasia. Some maps contain a small area of actual survey requiring only one photo while others are very full of detail making many photos necessary. For the list of maps go to innermostasiamaps

 
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Comparison of maps in Serindia and Innermostasia

In this index we have compared the maps from the two series in attempt to show which maps duplicate the same area. Since the maps in Innermostasia each contain an area 4 times as large as that in Serindia maps and many either over lap or are of different areas the comparisons are not exact.

 
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Aurel Stein - Other Maps

Stein produced a special map of the Han Dynasty section north of Tun-hung for Serindia. Another map is of Chinese Turkestan and part of Kansu from Aurel Stein's book The Ruins of Desert Cathay on his second expedition, which he published to augment Serindia. Another map is from the area around Khotan from his book Ancient Khotan about his first expedition. And there is an excellent map from Sand-buried ruins of Khotan. Hopefully these maps will enhance the reader's ability to place the relationships between the various places mentioned in the books.

 
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This file includes a listing of the individual map sheets from both Serindia and Innermostasia which show sections of the Han wall with towers.

This is a listing of the towers and structures Sir Aurel Stein found on the ancient Han Dynasty wall - this wall extends from east to west along the Su-lo Ho, mostly on the left, south bank, but on its eastern section on the right, north bank. The towers, however, are numbered more in the order in which Stein visited them, and he first came across the wall toward its western end, on the caravan route to Tun-Huang. Here we list them in Stein's numbering system, more or less in sequence from the western end toward the east.

 
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